Waldrip family saw education as door to success; new Frisco ISD Superintendent ready to know every student by name and need as he guides fast-growing school district

mikewaldrip

Get to know Frisco ISD’s new Superintendent

SET COLLEGE AS A STEPPING STONE: Growing up in a small town in West Texas, there was never any doubt that Frisco ISD Supt. Mike Waldrip and his younger brother would go to college.

“It was a non-negotiable as far as my father was concerned,” Waldrip said. “He didn’t really care what we did or where we studied, but we were going to college because he always felt like it was going to do things for us that he and my Mom never had the ability to do because they lacked that kind of education.”

The Waldrip family viewed education as a gateway to success – a philosophy Mike Waldrip carried with him and has shared with thousands of students over the course of his 35-year career as a school teacher, coach and administrator.

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS, CREATING CAREERS: Now as new Superintendent of schools at Frisco ISD, many of the lessons he learned as a young person, such as the importance of hard work and personal relationships, have shaped the leader and educator he is today.

PostTX

CWPostAs a student in Post in northwest Texas – a rural community (pop. 3,800, 2,600 elevation) founded by C.W. Post, who launched Post Cereals – Waldrip played every sport available, including football, basketball and track. He says his coaches, along with his fourth grade teacher, inspired him to pursue a career in education.

“I made that decision very early on that that’s what I wanted to do with my life,” he said. “I just remember thinking in middle school, it would be really cool to teach and coach because these guys look like they’re having a lot of fun doing what they’re doing.”

 

COLLEGE DAYS FOR WALDRIP

AngeloState
Angelo State – San Angelo Texas

At a towering 6 feet-6 inches, Waldrip played basketball for a year after high school at Angelo State University.

Waldrip earned his bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech, where he studied physical education and biology.

TexasTech

After graduation, he put Lubbock, Texas, in his rear view mirror to take on his first teaching and coaching job in in the South Texas community of Victoria, before moving on to Goliad and then west to Seminole. In all, he spent 16 years as a biology teacher and basketball coach.

“I always liked trying to create a situation in the classroom where kids could involve themselves in the learning and they could be inquisitive and ask questions and learn some things for themselves,” Waldrip said.

Sul Ross State University
Sul Ross State – Alpine Texas

He went on to serve as assistant principal at Seminole High School and earned his master’s degree from Sul Ross State University in 2000.

BOUNCING TO FRISCO, TEXAS

In 2002, a one-time rival on the basketball court – former Centennial High School and Clark Middle School Principal Randy Spain – recruited Waldrip to Frisco ISD.

ClarkMSFriscoISD

Waldrip served first as principal at Clark Middle School; and then as the District’s first-ever director of secondary instruction.

Waldrip opened Liberty High School as principal in 2006, something he says was one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences of his career.

LibertyHSFriscoISD

“Just being able to put a complete staff together, open a high school brand new and set the vision and course for what the school was going to be like,” Waldrip said. “I always said I wanted Liberty to be a place where kids enjoyed coming to school and teachers enjoyed coming to work, and that’s what we tried to focus on to create that type of environment for everyone.”

 

BECOMING DR. WALDRIP

UNT
North Texas – Denton Texas

Waldrip earned his Doctor of Education from The University of North Texas in 2008 and  in 2010 he move to central administration, where he oversaw data systems, program evaluation and various Frisco ISD departments.

“I have always believed that you can’t make informed decisions unless you have some things to inform your decisions,” Waldrip said. “Data doesn’t necessarily give you all the answers, but it certainly helps narrow the areas where you need to look to find those answers.”

BECOMING A SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT

In 2014, Waldrip accepted the position of superintendent of schools in nearby Coppell ISD. He says the experience prepared him for the job in Frisco ISD, which now has more than 56,000 students. Frisco ISD is poised to soon become the third largest school district in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

“I think being the leader of any school district, you see the importance of engaging the community in what you’re doing and telling your story,” Waldrip said. “It’s important to solicit the community’s input because it is their school district and you want to provide the kind of education that they want for their kids.”

HOME IN FRISCO TEXAS

friscoisdlogo1

Frisco ISD is home for Waldrip and his wife Lisa, who have two sons who graduated from Frisco ISD schools. Waldrip said he’s inspired by the school district’s mission statement to know every student by name and need

“I think they [Frisco families] think, ‘Well that’s a place that I would like for my kids to go to school, if those people are really focused on knowing my child by name and knowing what their needs are,’” he said. “I think that’s a huge unifying factor for the school district, even though people come from different communities, areas and backgrounds.

“Frisco ISD has a long legacy of providing a quality education and there is no reason for this not to continue,” he said. “We have educators up for the task and a community that desires and supports this type of education for their kids.

“I am very blessed to be able to lead Frisco ISD in that work,” he said. “My wife and I couldn’t be happier to be moving back to the place we call home.”

Dr. Waldrip succeeds Dr. Jeremy Lyon, who retired in June after more than four years as Frisco ISD superintendent and 31 years in public education. The selection of Dr. Waldrip as lone finalist concluded a two-month search for Dr. Lyon’s replacement. With the assistance of Jenny Preston Consulting, the Board garnered public input from community members as well as FISD staff to develop a wish list of qualities the District desired in a new superintendent.

During the almost 60-day process, applications were received from across the country.

Frisco ISD School Board President Anne McCausland said: “Hiring a superintendent is the most far-reaching decision a school board will ever make. This Board focused its energies to find the best fit for our students, staff, parents and community. We are thrilled to have Dr. Mike Waldrip continue our commitment to student achievement and keep Frisco ISD a destination district.”

Advertisements

Frisco ISD growing fast; three schools under construction

Frisco ISD welcomed nearly 49,000 students for the first day of school on Aug. 25 – a jump of approximately 2,500 students since June.

Five schools, including Independence High School and Hosp, McSpedden, Newman and Scott elementary schools, opened to students and teachers for the first time.

The new schools bring the total number of campuses in Frisco ISD to 61 for the 2014-2015 school year, including seven high schools, 13 middle schools, 37 elementary schools and four special program centers.

Student enrollment is projected to grow to 66,000 students by 2020, and FISD expects to welcome its 50,000th student this school year.

Despite the growth, the District remains committed to smaller, personalized learning environments.

“We will continue to focus attention on staying connected and engaged with each other, with students, and with you as parents,” Superintendent Dr. Jeremy Lyon wrote in a back-to-school letter to the community. “We believe our partnership with you is of significant importance to the success of your child in their educational journey.”

Two schools have been closed to additional students for the 2014-2015 school year. New students enrolling at Stafford Middle School or Ashley Elementary School will enroll at nearby schools instead, with transportation provided by the District. Both campuses are over capacity.

Frisco ISD has three schools under construction to relieve overcrowding and prepare for incoming students. They include Reedy High School, Trent Middle School and middle school No. 15, which has yet to be named. All will open in fall 2015

Reedy High School, 3003 Stonebrook Parkway, will open with ninth and tenth graders to primarily relieve Frisco High School.

Wakeland High School will need relief as well. Trent Middle School, 13131 Coleto Creek Drive, will open to relieve Stafford Middle School. Middle school No. 15 will open near Stonebrook Parkway and Teel Parkway to relieve Pioneer Heritage Middle School.

The process to create attendance boundaries for the new schools and to make other needed zone adjustments will begin this October, with a final decision expected in December. Learn more about the rezoning process.

Site preparation work is also underway for high school No. 9, which will open in fall 2016 near Lebanon Road and Ohio Drive.

The plan is to open the school with ninth graders only to limit impact on students living in areas recently impacted by rezoning with the opening of Independence this fall. Without high school #9, two of the high schools on the east side of Preston Road will be over capacity in 2016, with the other two pushing capacity.

%d bloggers like this: